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If no one said All that is required for evil to prevail is for good men to do nothing.”, then someone should have, because it is true. The same thing goes for bullies and injustice. As scary as it can be, if you are going to consider yourself human, then you have to speak out for what it right.
Thursday, August 22 2013

Reports from the USA provide details of law enforcement bodies using the technology for a vast range of tracking and other ‘law enforcement’ purposes. In New South Wales (Australia) I was involved in the trials of the technology following its success in Victoria (Australia). The stated purpose for the use of the technology by the NSW registration and licensing authority (Road & Maritime Services) is ‘to identify if (heavy - trucks) vehicles pass particular detection points to determine fatigue compliance, average speed compliance and compliance with access rules relating to Bus and transit lane rules’. I know from discussions at the time the idea was for Police to detect unregistered and stolen vehicles. Once someone was pulled over a check would be made to detect if the driver was unlicensed or had outstanding warrants for his/her arrest. This seems reasonable considering the intent of the system. A previous NSW Privacy Commissioner was dead against the use of tracking for private motor vehicles.

Yet in the USA, we are told ‘Departments keep the records for weeks or years, sometimes indefinitely.’ ‘Law enforcement officials said the scanners can be crucial to tracking suspicious cars, aiding drug busts and finding abducted children.’ ‘In Yonkers, N.Y., just north of the Bronx, police said retaining the information indefinitely helps detectives solve future crimes.’ ‘..increasingly, all of this data is being fed into massive databases that contain the location information of many millions of innocent Americans stretching back for months or even years.’ ‘Some police have defended this practice by

Reports from the USA provide details of law enforcement bodies using the technology for a vast range of tracking and other ‘law enforcement’ purposes. In New South Wales (Australia) I was involved in the trials of the technology following its success in Victoria (Australia). The stated purpose for the use of the technology by the NSW registration and licensing authority (Road & Maritime Services) is ‘to identify if (heavy - trucks) vehicles pass particular detection points to determine fatigue compliance, average speed compliance and compliance with access rules relating to Bus and transit lane rules’. I know from discussions at the time the idea was for Police to detect unregistered and stolen vehicles. Once someone was pulled over a check would be made to detect if the driver was unlicensed or had outstanding warrants for his/her arrest. This seems reasonable considering the intent of the system. A previous NSW Privacy Commissioner was dead against the use of tracking for private motor vehicles.

Yet in the USA, we are told ‘Departments keep the records for weeks or years, sometimes indefinitely.’ ‘Law enforcement officials said the scanners can be crucial to tracking suspicious cars, aiding drug busts and finding abducted children.’ ‘In Yonkers, N.Y., just north of the Bronx, police said retaining the information indefinitely helps detectives solve future crimes.’ ‘..increasingly, all of this data is being fed into massive databases that contain the location information of many millions of innocent Americans stretching back for months or even years.’ ‘Some police have defended this practice by arguing, essentially, that “you never know when or what we might need to solve a crime.’

‘The ACLU found that only five states have laws governing license plate readers.’ The ACLU went on to say ‘We now have technologies that enable the creation of very detailed data on our activities. Those technologies are only going to get more powerful and more pervasive. We need to make a choice as a society about the extent to which we want to allow the government to store up that data so that it has the power to hit “rewind” on everybody’s lives. In our view, that’s just too much power.’

Encouragingly in the UK ‘The Information Commissioner's Office said Hertfordshire Constabulary's use of cameras in and around the town of Royston was in breach of the law. It said the force had failed to carry out required privacy impact checks.’

essentially, that “you never know when or what we might need to solve a crime.’

‘The ACLU found that only five states have laws governing license plate readers.’ The ACLU went on to say ‘We now have technologies that enable the creation of very detailed data on our activities. Those technologies are only going to get more powerful and more pervasive. We need to make a choice as a society about the extent to which we want to allow the government to store up that data so that it has the power to hit “rewind” on everybody’s lives. In our view, that’s just too much power.’

Encouragingly in the UK ‘The Information Commissioner's Office said Hertfordshire Constabulary's use of cameras in and around the town of Royston was in breach of the law. It said the force had failed to carry out required privacy impact checks.’

Posted by: Youngman Consultancy AT 02:05 pm   |  Permalink   |  0 Comments  |  Email
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